7 Common John Deere 757 Problems and Solutions (from a Pro)

The John Deere 757 is a versatile, mid-size commercial lawn mower known for its high performance and reliability. Whether you’re tending to large yards or maintaining expansive golf courses, this workhorse is trusted by many. However, like any machine, it is not immune to issues.

The John Deere 757 comprises multiple components working together seamlessly. When one component malfunctions, it can impact the overall performance. For instance, the engine may experience problems such as backfiring or overheating, often caused by inadequate fuel additives or debris accumulation around the cooling fins. These issues can result in suboptimal tractor performance.

Another critical component is the blade, controlled by the blade clutch. If the clutch fails due to excessive engine heat, it can disrupt the operation, rendering the mower unusable for the task at hand.

Achieving a harmonious balance between air and fuel is crucial for proper functioning. However, an excessive amount of air can disrupt this delicate balance, leading to a lean running condition. Similarly, a clogged carburetor can impede fuel delivery, affecting the mower’s performance.

The pulley and belt are often overlooked but play a vital role. Over greasing these components can reduce their grip and compromise their functionality. Additionally, power loss caused by faulty spark plugs or poor fuel flow can negatively impact the mower’s performance.

7 Common John Deere 757 Problems and their Fixes

Even with meticulous care and maintenance, unforeseen issues can arise. As the experienced user, Tom suggests, “You treat her right, she’ll mow ’till twilight!” However, there may be instances where troubleshooting becomes necessary.

In the following guide, we will address common and uncommon problems with the John Deere 757 and provide solutions to help you keep your mower running smoothly.

Table of Contents

1. Engine Backfiring Frequently

Engine backfiring is a common issue that can occur in vehicles, including lawnmowers such as the John Deere 757. This problem is often caused by fewer fuel additives resulting in overheating. When the engine overheats, it can affect its function and cause it to backfire frequently. This can be a frustrating and potentially dangerous issue that requires attention and proper maintenance to prevent further damage.

Symptoms and Potential Causes

SymptomPotential Cause
Engine backfiring frequentlyFewer fuel additives resulting in overheating
Engine running hotFewer fuel additives resulting in overheating
Loss of powerFewer fuel additives resulting in overheating

Problems and Solutions

ProblemSolution
Fewer fuel additives resulting in overheatingAdd the recommended amount of fuel additives to prevent overheating
Engine running hotCheck and replace the coolant if necessary to prevent overheating
Loss of powerCheck and replace the air filter if necessary to improve engine performance

Step by Step Solutions on How to Fix Engine Backfiring Frequently in John Deere 757 Tractors

Add the recommended amount of fuel additives to prevent overheating. 

John Deere Fuel-Protect Diesel Fuel Conditioners are recommended for use with low-sulfur diesel, ultra-low sulfur diesel, and biodiesel up to 20% blends. These fuel additives can help maintain fuel quality and prevent fuel-related equipment issues. John Deere Fuel-Protect Diesel Fuel Conditioners come in both Summer and Winter formulas. The Summer formula provides benefits such as increasing cetane number, preventing deposits and cleaning fuel systems in legacy vehicles, and preventing fuel pump and injector wear. The Winter formula provides all the same benefits as the Summer Formula with the addition of an additive to improve cold filter plugging and a deicer.

Check and replace the coolant if necessary to prevent overheating. 

Checking and replacing the coolant in your John Deere 757 can help prevent overheating. The coolant helps regulate the engine’s temperature by absorbing heat from the engine and transferring it to the radiator. If the coolant level is low or if it is old and has lost its effectiveness, it may not be able to properly regulate the engine temperature, leading to overheating. To check the coolant level, locate the coolant reservoir and check if the coolant is at the appropriate level. If it is low, add more coolant until it reaches the appropriate level. If the coolant is old or dirty, it may need to be replaced.

Check and replace the air filter if necessary to improve engine performance. 

Checking and replacing the air filter in your John Deere 757 can help improve engine performance. The air filter helps prevent dirt, dust, and other contaminants from entering the engine. If the air filter is dirty or clogged, it can restrict airflow to the engine, leading to a loss of power. To check the air filter, locate it and remove it from its housing. Inspect it for dirt or debris. If it is dirty or clogged, replace it with a new one.

2. Failed Blade Clutch

A failed blade clutch in a John Deere 757 can be a frustrating issue that affects the blade’s function. This problem is often caused by excess heat from the engine. When the engine overheats, it can cause the blade clutch to fail, preventing the blade from engaging properly. This can result in poor cutting performance and potential damage to the mower. Proper maintenance and attention to the engine’s temperature can help prevent this issue.

Symptoms and Potential Causes

SymptomPotential Cause
Blade not engagingFailed blade clutch due to excess heat from the engine
Poor cutting performanceFailed blade clutch due to excess heat from the engine
Engine overheatingExcess heat from the engine causes failed blade clutch

Problems and Solutions

ProblemSolution
Failed blade clutch due to excess heat from the engineCheck and replace the coolant if necessary to prevent overheating
Engine overheatingCheck and replace the coolant if necessary to prevent overheating
Poor cutting performanceCheck and replace the blade clutch if necessary to improve cutting performance

Step by Step Solutions on How to Fix Failed Blade Clutch in John Deere 757 Tractors

Check and replace the blade clutch if necessary to improve cutting performance. 

Checking and replacing the blade clutch in your John Deere 757 can help improve cutting performance. The blade clutch engages and disengages the mower blades. If the blade clutch has failed due to excess heat from the engine, it may prevent the blades from engaging properly, leading to poor cutting performance. To check and replace the blade clutch, you will need to access it by removing any necessary components. Once you have access to it, inspect it for signs of damage or wear. If it is damaged or worn, replace it with a new one.

3. Lean Running Condition

A lean running condition in a John Deere 757 can occur when there is excess air causing a poor air-to-fuel ratio in the engine. This can result in the engine running too lean, which can affect its function and performance. A lean running condition can cause symptoms such as poor acceleration, loss of power, and engine misfires. Proper maintenance and attention to the air-to-fuel ratio can help prevent this issue.

Symptoms and Potential Causes

SymptomPotential Cause
Poor accelerationLean running condition due to excess air causing a poor air-to-fuel ratio
Loss of powerLean running condition due to excess air causing a poor air-to-fuel ratio
Engine misfiresLean running condition due to excess air causing a poor air-to-fuel ratio

Problems and Solutions

ProblemSolution
Lean running condition due to excess air causing a poor air-to-fuel ratioCheck and adjust the air-to-fuel ratio to prevent a lean running condition
Poor accelerationCheck and adjust the air-to-fuel ratio to improve acceleration
Loss of powerCheck and adjust the air-to-fuel ratio to improve engine performance

Step by Step Solutions on How to Fix Lean Running Condition in John Deere 757 Tractors

Check and adjust the air-to-fuel ratio to prevent a lean running condition. 

Checking and adjusting the air-to-fuel ratio in your John Deere 757 can help prevent a lean running condition. The air-to-fuel ratio refers to the amount of air that is mixed with the fuel in the engine. If there is excess air causing a poor air-to-fuel ratio, it can result in the engine running too lean. To check and adjust the air-to-fuel ratio, you will need to locate the air-fuel mixture screw on the engine’s carburetor. This screw controls how much air mixes with the fuel. Adjusting this screw changes how fast or slow an engine idles and how smoothly it runs. Turn the screw clockwise to reduce the amount of air that is mixed with the fuel, or counterclockwise to increase it.

4. Fuel Delivery Problems

Fuel delivery problems in the John Deere 757 can be caused by a clogged carburetor. This affects the fuel system’s function and can lead to irregular fuel delivery. A clogged carburetor can cause it to release more fuel than it should. In addition, abnormal gasoline distribution may occur if there is a leak in the fuel lines and hoses.

Symptoms and Causes

SymptomsCauses
Unusual Fuel DeliveryClogged Carburetor
Abnormal Gasoline DistributionLeak in Fuel Lines and Hoses

Problems and Solutions

ProblemsSolutions
Clogged CarburetorClean or replace the carburetor
Leak in Fuel Lines and HosesCheck for leaks and repair or replace as necessary

Step by Step Solutions on How to Fix Fuel Delivery Problems in John Deere 757 Tractors

Leaks in Fuel Lines and Hoses

A leak in the fuel lines and hoses can cause abnormal gasoline distribution. To solve this problem, check for leaks and repair or replace as necessary. Here are the steps to check for leaks in fuel lines and hoses:

  1. Shut off Your Fuel Supply: Use your fuel shut-off valve to stop fuel flow.
  2. Inspect Fuel Lines and Hoses: Check the fuel lines and hoses for any signs of damage or wear. If you find any leaks, you must repair or replace them as soon as possible.

It is important to check for leaks in the fuel lines and hoses because a leak can cause abnormal gasoline distribution and affect the performance of the engine.

5. Faulty Pulley and Belt

A common issue with the John Deere 757 is that the pulley and belt can become faulty due to an inner part that is too greasy. This affects the pulley and belt’s function. The grooves in the pulleys can collect debris or mud causing your belt to come off your John Deere. The material in the pulleys causes your belt to have to stretch around the additional material putting stress on the belt. This can cause the belt to roll off the pulley or possibly just snap.

Symptoms and Causes

SymptomPotential Cause
Belt keeps coming offLoose or worn belt
Belt keeps coming offBelt guide damage
Belt keeps coming offShredded belt
Belt keeps coming offDebris collecting on top of your mower deck

Problems and Solutions

ProblemSolution
Loose or worn beltLook over your belt and make sure it is sitting tight to the pulleys and doesn’t appear worn with a shiny or cracked appearance. If your belt has any of these conditions present, you must replace your belt
Belt guide damageFix the guide by using a hammer or vice grip to bend the belt guide back in place
Shredded beltIf you notice the edges on your belt are shredded, first, make sure your belt is routed around your pulleys correctly. Refer to your owner’s manual or an online parts diagram to confirm you have it correctly installed. Second, if your belt is routed correctly, look for the bracket or belt guide part that is making contact with your deck belt
Debris collecting on top of your mower deckClean debris from the top of the mower deck

Step by Step Solutions on How to Fix Faulty Pulley and Belt in John Deere 757 Tractors

Loose or Worn Belt

Why it’s important

Over time, your mower deck belt will wear from normal use causing it to become loose and come off. A loose or worn belt can cause the belt to come off the pulleys and affect the function of the pulley and belt.

How to fix it

  1. Look over your belt and make sure it is sitting tight to the pulleys and doesn’t appear worn with a shiny or cracked appearance.
  2. If your belt has any of these conditions present, you must replace your belt.

Belt Guide Damage

Why it’s important

You may have belt guides on your mower to assist with keeping your belt in place. Belt guides are metal rods that sit next to your pulleys. Your belt doesn’t actually touch these guides. They have added protection to keep your belt from slipping off the pulleys. The guides can become damaged and bent when there is slack in the belt and this extra slack hits a guide. A bent-guide may no longer be able to prevent your belt from coming out of place.

How to fix it

  1. Fix the guide by using a hammer or vice grip to bend the belt guide back in place.

Shredded Belt

Why it’s important

A belt can become damaged and shredded when it rubs against a belt guide or bracket on your mower deck. The shredded belt can become weakened and break causing it to come off your deck. A belt may also shred when it is not correctly installed.

How to fix it

  1. If you notice the edges on your belt are shredded, first, make sure your belt is routed around your pulleys correctly.
  2. Refer to your owner’s manual or an online parts diagram to confirm you have it correctly installed.
  3. Second, if your belt is routed correctly, look for the bracket or belt guide part that is making contact with your deck belt.

Debris Collecting on Top of Your Mower Deck

Why it’s important

Debris collecting on top of your mower deck can cause the grooves in the pulleys to collect debris or mud causing your belt to come off your John Deere. The material in the pulleys causes your belt to have to stretch around the additional material putting stress on the belt. This can cause the belt to roll off the pulley or possibly just snap.

How to fix it

  1. Clean debris from the top of the mower deck.

6. Engine Overheating

The engine can overheat when debris builds up around the cylinder head cooling fins. This causes engine temperature to exceed normal temperatures, leading to misfiring, poor performance, blown head gasket, and seized engine, among other problems.

Symptoms and Causes

SymptomPotential Cause
Engine overheatingDebris build-up around cylinder head cooling fins

Problems and Solutions

ProblemSolution
Debris build-up around cylinder head cooling finsClean debris from around cylinder head cooling fins

Step by Step Solutions on How to Fix Engine Overheating in John Deere 757 Tractors

Debris Build-Up Around Cylinder Head Cooling Fins

Why it’s important

Debris build-up around the cylinder head cooling fins can cause the engine temperature to exceed normal temperatures, leading to misfiring, poor performance, blown head gasket, and seized engine, among other problems.

How to fix it

  1. Clean debris from around cylinder head cooling fins.

7. Loss of Power

John Deere 757 Reviews

John Deere 757’s engine can experience a loss of power due to faulty spark plugs and poor fuel flow to the carburetor. This affects the engine’s function and can lead to poor performance.

Symptoms and Causes

SymptomPotential Cause
Loss of powerFaulty spark plugs
Loss of powerPoor fuel flow to carburetor

Problems and Solutions

ProblemSolution
Faulty spark plugsReplace spark plugs
Check and clean the fuel filterCheck and clean fuel filter

Step by Step Solutions on How to Fix Loss of Power in John Deere 757 Tractors

Faulty Spark Plugs

Why it’s important

Faulty spark plugs can cause a loss of power in the engine. Spark plugs are responsible for igniting the fuel and air mixture in the engine’s combustion chamber. If the spark plugs are not functioning correctly, the engine may not be able to burn fuel efficiently, leading to a loss of power.

How to fix it

  1. Replace spark plugs.

Poor Fuel Flow to Carburetor

Why it’s important

Poor fuel flow to the carburetor can cause a loss of power in the engine. The carburetor is responsible for mixing air and fuel in the correct proportions for efficient combustion. If there is not enough fuel flowing to the carburetor, the engine may not be able to burn fuel efficiently, leading to a loss of power.

How to fix it

  1. Check and clean the fuel filter.

How We Created These Problems And Solutions Troubleshooting Guide

How to Prevent John Deere 757 from Getting into Troubles

The troubleshooting guide for the John Deere 757 was meticulously created through a comprehensive process that involved identifying and analyzing the common and uncommon problems faced by the mower. These issues were caused by various factors, such as fuel additives being fewer, excess heat from the engine, and the accumulation of debris around the cylinder head cooling fins. 

It described the backfiring of the engine, the failure of the blade clutch, and the lean running condition resulting from poor air-to-fuel ratio. Additionally, it addressed fuel delivery problems caused by a clogged carburetor and the malfunctioning of the pulley and belt due to excessive grease. 

This guide emphasized the detrimental consequences, such as engine overheating and the loss of power, caused by faulty spark plugs and insufficient fuel flow to the carburetor. To ensure clarity, this guide explained the troubleshooting steps, including cleaning, flow optimization, and necessary component replacements.

Given These Problems, Should You Sell and Replace Your Existing John Deere 757?

As an experienced hand with tractors—especially the good old John Deere 757—I understand your worries. Sure, it’s got its quirks—engine backfires, wonky blade clutches, the occasional overheating. But, let’s face it—we’ve seen worse, haven’t we?

Remember, this machine’s worth a little elbow grease. Repairing the carburetor, swapping spark plugs, or just tidying up the cooling fins—simple fixes really, can breathe new life into it.

That being said, if she’s causing you more downtime than uptime, it might be time to think about an upgrade. Newer models have come a long way—they’re more efficient and they break down less. Plus, they’re slicker and quicker.

But if your needs are growing (like cultivating larger fields or handling tougher tasks), consider getting a bigger, more capable beast. Tractors are like boots—the right fit makes all the difference. So, whether you keep, upgrade, or size up—make the choice that suits you best. It’s all part of the journey, isn’t it?

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